Electrical Terms

Voltage Source and Current Source

A Source is a device which converts mechanical, chemical, thermal or some other form of energy into electrical energy. In other words, the source is an active network element meant for generating electrical energy. The various types of sources available in the electrical network are voltage source and current sources. A voltage source has a …

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Nodal Voltage Analysis Method

The Nodal Voltage Analysis is a method to solve the electrical network. It is used where it is essential to compute all branch currents.The nodal voltage analysis method determines the voltage and current by using the nodes of the circuit. A node is a terminal or connection of more than two elements. The nodal voltage …

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Mesh Current Analysis Method

Mesh Current Analysis Method is used to analyze and solve the electrical network having various sources or the circuit consisting of several meshes or loop with a voltage or current sources. It is also known as the Loop Current Method. In the Mesh Current method, a distinct current is assumed in the loop and the …

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Substitution Theorem

Substitution Theorem states that the voltage across any branch or the current through that branch of a network being known, the branch can be replaced by the combination of various elements that will make the same voltage and current through that branch. In other words, the Substitution Theorem says that for branch equivalence, the terminal voltage …

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Maximum Power Transfer Theorem

Maximum Power Transfer Theorem states that – A resistive load, being connected to a DC network, receives maximum power when the load resistance is equal to the internal resistance known as (Thevenin’s equivalent resistance) of the source network as seen from the load terminals. The Maximum Power Transfer theorem is used to find the load …

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Reciprocity Theorem

Reciprocity Theorem states that – In any branch of a network or circuit, the current due to a single source of voltage (V) in the network is equal to the current through that branch in which the source was originally placed when the source is again put in the branch in which the current was …

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Norton’s Theorem

Norton’s Theorem states that – A linear active network consisting of the independent or dependent voltage source and current sources and the various circuit elements can be substituted by an equivalent circuit consisting of a current source in parallel with a resistance. The current source being the short-circuited current across the load terminal and the …

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Millman’s Theorem

The Millman’s Theorem states that – when a number of voltage sources (V1, V2, V3……… Vn) are in parallel having internal resistance (R1, R2, R3………….Rn) respectively, the arrangement can replace by a single equivalent voltage source V in series with an equivalent series resistance R.  In other words; it determines the voltage across the parallel branches …

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Compensation Theorem

Compensation Theorem states that in a linear time-invariant network when the resistance (R) of an uncoupled branch, carrying a current (I), is changed by (ΔR), then the currents in all the branches would change and can be obtained by assuming that an ideal voltage source of (VC) has been connected such that VC = I …

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